People

W

Betty Wilson

I was born in North Wales at a small hill farm just outside Llangollen. The farm was called Tan-y-bwlch and was rented from the big house not far away. There were six children in the family and I was the second eldest. There was my brother John, and then me, and then a sister Doreen, another brother Arthur and two younger sisters, Nora and Eileen. My father`s father had been in the Army during the Crimean War and the Indian Mutiny but came back to run the farm. He died aged about sixty when my father was fourteen and so my father and his mother had to run the farm. He was the eldest of five children. Read more....

Linda Wilson

My name is Linda Wilson nee Gracey and I was brought up in Northern Ireland but born in Glasgow. I have travelled all over Europe and as far as the Lebanon. At the age of 18 I went to Switzerland as an au pair. Originally I wanted to teach ecology but I ended up on the wards nursing. I loved nursing, especially nursing the elderly. I understand that many nurses are people born under the sign of Taurus, as I was. We are supposed to be caring and motherly. My first hospital was the Ulster Hospital in Belfast which is in the suburbs unlike the Victoria Hospital which is in the centre of the town. I was an auxiliary nurse. Read more....

Tom Williamson

I am Tom Williamson. I was born at Beckingham near Gainsborough where my father was the recently-appointed headmaster of the local primary school. We lived in the school house next door to the school, which brought many benefits such as riding my trike round the playground when all the children had gone home and being able to sneak into some of the lessons the ones you liked, not sums! The school is still operating but the house is a private house now. Read more....



Margaret Winn

Grandma's Gleanings from Newton's Woolsthorpe, Recollections from a Lincolnshire Hamlet By Margaret Anne Winn Published in 1994. This is a collection of stories and facts, recording the childhood of the Robinson children and their way of life growing up in Woolsthorpe in the early 1900's. Read more....





Marian Woolerton

Oral history collected when Miss Marian Woolerton visited Woolsthorpe Manor on 19th November 2001: Marian Woolerton was born in the hamlet of Woolsthorpe, September 1903, in the Wagggoners Cottage. She came to live in the Manor as a little girl and grew up here when her parents took over running the Manor farm after her grandparents stopped farming. She remembered sleeping in the small panelled portion in the room now known as the Hall Chamber, whilst her parents slept in the main room. Marian sat in the back kitchen and tried to remember how it was a working kitchen during her childhood. The hooks on the beams in the kitchen were used for hanging hams and bacon joints after the pig was killed. This was usually done in November so that everything was ready for Christmas. Read more....

Don Wright

I am Don Wright and I came to live in Lincolnshire with Margaret my wife in 1960. We came from Sheffield where I was teaching at the King Edward the Seventh School. We lived first in Grantham and came to live in Colsterworth in 1971. I came to get job at Stoke Rochford Hall. It was called Kesteven Training College in those days. Up to 1960 it was a two-year teacher training course but in 1960 it was increased to three years, taking in more students because of the increasing school population. Consequently more staff was wanted and so I was appointed lecturer in Biology. I started working in what people recognise as the Orangery at Stoke Rochford Hall where it was very hot in the summer and pretty cold in the winter. But was a pleasant place because you had the most delightful view out onto the lakes and the grounds. We moved later to laboratories in the Stable Yard. Read more....

Margaret Wright

I am Margaret Wright and I was born in County Durham and went to Neville`s Cross College in Durham. It was a two-year course then if you wanted to teach primary school children. My first job was at Easington, a coal-mining village on the coast. We had two hundred infant boys in the school, they were lovely little lads. I was there at the time of the great mining disaster in 1952 when 80 men were killed. The next day there were only eight children in school. I stayed there for four years and when Don and I got married we moved to Sheffield. I taught at a big school with a large playground but no garden. I went to school for 2d on the tram. My father-in-law was the head of a primary school in Durham and it so happened that one time we were on holiday when he was still working so I went into his school one afternoon to help out. My father-in-law said to the children, `Be careful how you treat Mrs Wright because she is used to tough city children not paper tigers like you`. Read more....

Olive Wright

My name is Olive Adams and I as born at Pickworth near Folkingham, Lincolnshire, on March 17, 1921. When I was three years old we moved to Sapperton. I started at Ropsley school when I was six years old. I was late starting school because I was ill. I had some sort of chest ailment, similar to the one I suffer from now. I can`t remember having any treatment for it except Scott`s Emulsion. I did not go to hospital and only saw the doctor occasionally. He said it was muscular something or other. I did not know I was ill, I just played happily at home. My brother was a year and a half older than I was and each day when he came home, whatever he had done at school I did it again with him. I could read before I went to school, which came about because the Attendance Officer, it appeared, was looking for this Olive Rastell (as I was then). Well, he found me and off I went to start my education. Read more....