The Ironstone

The Ironstone

Albert Atter

My name is Albert Atter and I was born in a house near the Chapel on Back Lane on November 1st, 1930. Then when I was five years old we all moved to Woolsthorpe and lived in a council house on the Woolsthorpe Road. We were a family of nine, five sisters and four brothers. A few of them are not around now, but I still have my five sisters. Their names are Betty, Nancy, Margaret, Wendy, Peggy, Cecil, also Ron and Ernie. Cecil was the oldest and was, at one time, in the Coldstream Guards. Read more....


Albert Brown

About 5 miles south of Grantham on the East Coast Main Line lies Stoke Tunnel. Near the mouth of the tunnel is a collection of sidings, a water tower, an office and a signal box named Highdyke. From here ran a single line branch, up hill and down dale across the country to various ironstone pits that littered the countryside in this part of the world. Wagons full of stone would be brought down and stored in sidings forming trains of ironstone that would leave Highdyke each day for the iron and steel works at Scunthorpe. Read more....


Colin Dickinson

I am Colin Dickinson and I was born in 1935 at Church Street, South Witham. My grandparents kept the Angel Inn in Church Street. My father used to work on the white-stone pit at South Witham. White-stone is the lime-stone. They would excavate the stone, break it up with hammers and throw it into the wagons. That went to the alum works at Howell near Melton and was used in the making of cast-iron pipes for Stanton. He went to Thistleton School. I had three brothers and three sisters, four of whom are still living. I was the last of the family. I have a photograph with them all on as children, but I am not on it as I wasn`t born then. Read more....

Noel Sims

I am Noel Sims. I was born on the 1st of December, 1932 at Mill Cottages in Colsterworth, near Mill Farm just off the Stainby Road. My grandparents had a road haulage business in the late nineteenth century in Sparkbrook in Birmingham. When I say a road haulage business, it was horses and drays. They had 10 or 11 drays on the road every day but they had over 14 or 15 horses. Mostly they went to the two railway stations in Birmingham to pick up loads which was mainly beer, delivering it to all the pubs. My father had to go, with some of his brothers, into the Army in the First World War and that split up the family completely. All the horses and drays were sold as there was no-one to look after them. The breweries took them over and my grandfather moved to Leicester where he did the same work. Read more....