People

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William and John Senescall - Church and Chapel

John: We are William Isaac and John Rippin Senescall. We were born at the top of Read's Lane on Woolsthorpe Road, next to the old Sir Isaac Newton pub kept by Mr and Mrs Reed. There were six of us but one boy died very young. There were two older sisters, then Bill and then John and George who were twins born in 1930. George has passed on now. Grandfather William Senescall lived at a farmhouse behind Red Cottages at Stoke Rochford. Dad, (George) and his elder brother, Edward (Ted) walked to school at Great Ponton. Grandfather lived in two houses in Woolsthorpe, the last one being the old stone house opposite the pond. He had the coal yard on the corner of Bright's Lane and the Pinfold. Coal and other materials were brought up the Woolsthorpe Road siding by LNER (London and North-Eastern Railway). The siding is now a nature reserve. Read more....

Peter Shaw

I am Peter Shaw and I live in a house called Cordwainers which may surprise some people as there are those who don`t know what a cordwainer is. It is an old name for a shoe-maker. We have always called our houses, wherever we have lived, Cordwainers. There is still in existance in London a cordwainer`s technical college. They don`t really teach the handcraft like they used to but they do a lot of shoe design and attache cases, but it is still there. I was born in Northampton, the home of shoes. Read more....

Noel Sims

I am Noel Sims. I was born on the 1st of December, 1932 at Mill Cottages in Colsterworth, near Mill Farm just off the Stainby Road. My grandparents had a road haulage business in the late nineteenth century in Sparkbrook in Birmingham. When I say a road haulage business, it was horses and drays. They had 10 or 11 drays on the road every day but they had over 14 or 15 horses. Mostly they went to the two railway stations in Birmingham to pick up loads which was mainly beer, delivering it to all the pubs. My father had to go, with some of his brothers, into the Army in the First World War and that split up the family completely. All the horses and drays were sold as there was no-one to look after them. The breweries took them over and my grandfather moved to Leicester where he did the same work. Read more....

Dr Eric Stafford

My name is Eric John Stafford and I was born on July 3rd 1925 in a little village called Crick in Monmouthshire, South Wales. I was a farmer's son but at sixteen and a half years of age I decided to have a go at medicine and so I went to Guys Hospital in London as a medical student in 1941 when the war was on. The first year I was evacuated to Tunbridge Wells after which I was still in Kent but came back to Guys for lectures. I got to know all about doodle bugs and those sort of things and we had to help deal with the casualties. Read more....



Joyce Stubbs

My name is Joyce Stubbs. I was Joyce Duffin before I was married. I was born in Nottingham Hospital by caesarean section; I have lived on the Easton Estate all my life. I went to Stoke Rochford Primary School and then on to Kesteven Girls' School. After that, I studied at Newcastle-upon-Tyne University and gained a B.Sc. in Agriculture. It all seems a long time ago now. I did work experience on various farms. I worked on the Estate for a year before I went to Newcastle and, during the holidays, I worked for Stubbs at Lodge Farm, Colsterworth, helping with the harvest, driving tractors, stacking bales and so on. I met my husband, David Stubbs, whilst working there. His family have farmed at Colsterworth since 1955. David himself was actually born at the farm in the days when people had their babies at home, and unfortunately he died there last year. When we got married we lived in Keeper's Cottage in the Park at Easton and then when my father-in-law retired we moved to Lodge Farm. Read more....

Mary Stedman

I was born at North Kelsey but we came back here when I was very young. I can only remember living here. We lived in one of a row of cottages up the Bourne Road called Canister Hall Cottages. When they were pulled down the stone went to the British Steel works. My name was Johnson. My father did not really do anything. He was not a well man. At one time he used to go to Easton Golf Course and help there. Sometimes he would bring us some golf balls to play with. If he got a job he was poorly. My mother really did all the work. My mother came from Derbyshire. She came with the Blands to Colsterworth House where the Woodlands Estate is today. The Blands came here for the hunting. My mother was the cook. She had left school at 12 years old and went to live with her aunt who had a farm in Derbyshire. I do not know how she came to work for the Blands. Captain Bland had some stables built but he never used them as he was killed in the Great War. My mother was wrapping up a cake to send to him when Algy Skillington came with the telegram that said he had been killed. Mrs Bland was still in bed recovering from the birth of their daughter, Patricia. He never saw her. Read more....

Maurice Snowball

My name is Maurice Snowball and I was born in Sunderland in 1922. I joined the RAF when I volunteered for Air Crew and started to do my training to be Flight Engineer in 1944. You have to do the basic marching and drill and things like that first. I went down to Lord`s Cricket Ground where all Air Crew had to report at the time. We were billeted in nearby flats. Royal Court was the one we were in. First we were issued with uniform of course, and then lined up for the injections. I had two teeth out as well because they said that they were dead and would not be good for someone in Air Crew. I ended up with my left arm aching with the jabs and my mouth was swollen. We got back to our flat and the corporal said, `Come on, I want this floor cleaned and everything tidied up!` So we set to but when he came in again, he reckoned that the flat was not clean and he wanted the job done properly, - ` and it will do your arm good as well!` Read more....